“The most extraordinary thing in the world is an ordinary man and an ordinary woman and their ordinary children." G K Chesterton

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

Wednesdays With Words: Week 9





Last week we had a flurry of quotes from the earlier part of the book. Here are my highlights from the last part of the book.  I mentioned in the comments of others posts last week that I loved the beginning of this book and expected to love the ending but did not enjoy the middle section. I will stick with that assessment. In the middle of the book Smith takes on cultural liturgies. What I found interesting is that he failed to realize that some cultural liturgies are important and really just an extension of Biblical liturgy in the way Morning Time is. Of course, there are many evil liturgies in the culture only I am not sure sneering at them is the answer. But that aside, I liked the book, it made me think and it even encouraged me. 

"The Lord’s Supper does not only hallow and sanctify nature’s biological processes that bring forth grain and grapes and compel us to eat and drink. After all, it’s not wheat and grapes that are on the table; it’s bread and wine. These are not naturally occurring phenomena; they are the fruit of culture, the products of human making."

"I often tell my children that one of the reasons we go to church is to learn to love people we don’t really like that much—people we find irritating, odd, and who grate on our nerves (the feeling’s certainly mutual, I’m sure!). "

"First, it may be the case, given the “quantity-of-immersion” challenge we’ve noted, that a Christian community that seeks to be a cultural force precisely by being a living example of a new humanity will have to consider abstaining from participation in some cultural practices that others consider normal."

"This is the pledge of those whose “citizenship is in heaven” (Phil. 3:20)—which is not citizenship in some otherworldly, ethereal kingdom but rather citizenship in an earthly kingdom that is coming."

8 comments:

  1. Hi All,
    Glad to hear your thoughts about "Desiring the Kingdom". Do you think you'll read the next book? After boring local friends and my husband with quotes from things they aren't that interested in I decided to start blogging again. That way, I can connect with people who might be interested in some of the conversation I have internally. I am still figuring things out so next week I will put more info than my name in the title line. Also, can I get directions on how to add the Wed. with words icon to my blog? I have really enjoyed following what everyone is reading the past few weeks. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The easiest way I know to add it is to download it to your computer and then add it using the add a picture tab. I am sure there is a better way but I am not savvy enough to know it.

      Delete
  2. Have you read "Living in God's Two Kingdoms" by David Van Drunen? It is a must for any Christian with reformed views.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Keep hearing about it. Adding it to my wish list.

      Delete
    2. Good sound theology and as a Christian it has been one of the most refreshing books I have ever read. He has several lectures as well from SermonAudio.


      Blessings

      Delete
  3. "I often tell my children that one of the reasons we go to church is to learn to love people we don’t really like that much—people we find irritating, odd, and who grate on our nerves (the feeling’s certainly mutual, I’m sure!)."

    Christians should be pursuing this at all times in all places, but church meetings are a good place to start. And it's not just "God said it, so I guess I have to do it". There's no quicker route to a deep understanding of God's economy, and the contentment that accompanies it.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Cindy,
    Just linked 'Ourselves.'

    ReplyDelete